17.03.2017 - Call for Papers / Participation
Fachinformationsdienst Darstellende Kunst

Call for Proposals: Performing Southeast Asia: Performance and Politics in the Contemporary. Closing date is April 30, 2017.

Performing Southeast Asia: Performance and Politics in the Contemporary Edited by Marcus Tan (National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore) and Charlene Rajendran (National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore) Palgrave Macmillan as part of the series ‘Contemporary Performance InterActions’, edited by Elaine Aston and Brian Singleton *(confirmation of interest). Performing Southeast Asia: Performance and Politics in the Contemporary will be dedicated to the critical examination and discussion of theatre and performance in twenty-first century Southeast Asia. It will investigate political and/or social action theatres of the recent decade and the works that have been produced to engage with the socio-politics of countries in Southeast Asia, and as a region – with its plurality and diversity contained within geo-political identities. The book will examine theatre and performance in urban centres of Southeast Asia for it is in these socio-economic and political epicentres that the contemporary is most present and made evident in performance. Broadly, Performing Southeast Asia seeks to examine new theatres and performances from the turn of the century and thereby expand existing representations in scholarly work. It is also less concerned with the study of tradition in modernity, the preservation of traditional theatres, their impact on contemporary forms of theatre, or the evolution of traditional forms. Specifically, the volume seeks to examine contemporaneity as it is responded to, realised and performed in the region. It will further consider how contemporary social and political events in Southeast Asia have impacted theatre and performance today and further consider the ways theatre and performance have negotiated, engaged and effected change in the political and social spheres of individual Southeast Asian countries, and possibly the region. The book will engage three broad themes: the performance of (post)identity politics in Southeast Asia from the turn of the century. These would include performances that engage with racial, ethnic, class, gender, national and regional identity politics – one here can cite the example of the ASEAN’s Festival of Arts and the representations of cultures to exemplify its objective of ‘cooperation in culture to help build an ASEAN identity’ (asean.org). The second delineation of the ‘contemporary’ would be theatre and performance’s engagement with current issues of social and political justice. These can include issues of migration and/or migrant labour, migrant (sub)cultures; social media, censorship and the state; the environment; local and/or regional political issues and issues of governance, and statehood. The third demarcation of the ‘contemporary’ used in the book would be the consideration of neoliberal practices and the impact on cultural practice, policy and performance in individual Southeast Asian countries and the region. These can include foreign / multi-national interventions, corporate collaborations and festival impetuses. We invite specifically proposals that examine contemporary theatre and performance in the urban centres of Southeast Asia but are particularly keen on contributions that examine the theatres of Lao PDR, Vietnam, Myanmar, and Brunei Darussalam. We are looking for chapter proposals that cover the following themes and issues: · Southeast Asian theatre and performance as (re)actions to current issues of social and political justice within the state and/or the region. These can include issues of migration, migrant labour and migrant (sub)cultures, social media, censorship and the state, regional / local politics and governance. · (Post)identity politics in Southeast Asian theatre and performance from the turn of the century: gender, race, ethnicity, class politics as well as national, regional identity politics. · Conditions of neoliberal practice (including foreign or multi-national stakeholders, pecuniary interventions, corporate collaborations and the festival impetus) and the impact on Southeast Asian theatre and performance and cultural policy today. · Spectatorship and performance; the politics of ‘seeing’ and participation in contemporary Southeast Asian performance. Please submit a 300 word proposal by 30 April to Marcus Tan (marcus.tan@nie.edu.sg) and Charlene Rajendran (charlene.r@nie.edu.sg). Please also include a short bio of about 100 words and one-page CV that lists your major publications. About co-editors: Marcus Tan is Assistant Professor at the National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University. He is the author of Acoustic Interculturalism: Listening to Performance (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012) and researches primarily in intercultural theatre and sound in performance. He has published many articles in these areas in books and journals such as Contemporary Theatre Review, Theatre Research International and The Drama Review. Marcus also examines political theatres in Singapore and teaches a course on Southeast Asian Theatre. Charlene Rajendran is Assistant Professor at the National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University. She engages with experimentation, identity and culture in a range of research and performance projects. Her work also focuses on developing arts-based pedagogies to develop dialogic encounters that deepen critical and aesthetic thinking. Her publications include creative works, articles in theatre journals and chapters in scholarly books. In recent years she has been dramaturg in a range of projects, including Both Sides, Now (2014, 2015, ArtsWok and Drama Box), It Won’t Be Too Long – The Cemetery (2015, Drama Box) and Ghost Writer (2016, The Necessary Stage).

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